FREE SHIPPING TO USA ON ORDERS OVER $75
FAQ
Your Mother Dirt Cart


You have 1 item is in your cart

 
SUBTOTAL (1 item) $30.00
For a Good Time

Call me:
774.270.2362
or
Email Me:
John.maden@gmail.com
Anytime 24/7

Promo Space Here

Part 2: The Hidden Ingredients We Screen For (And Why)

Blog Post Img

Where we can, we go above and beyond. For example, our recent MadeSafe® certification of our AO+ Mist gave our AO+ Mist the “seal of approval” in terms of freedom from identified toxins and red-list ingredients.

In this post, we talked about how the manufacturing process and supply chain present opportunity for cross-contamination and the formation of by-products based on chemistry that takes place during production.

We’ve developed a standard list of impurities we test for as part of an extensive QC process. You may not be familiar with many of the words listed below, but the list was developed based on industry e started with the industry standard, and the state-of-the-art toxicology around cosmetic ingredients. Then we had to take it a step further to be compatible with a balanced skin microbiome.  

Without any further ado - here’s that list of ingredients we test for to ensure they don’t end up in our formulas. For those curious, we also added a little more background on what they are and how they can end up in formulas.

 

1. Heavy Metals: These include lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic. The impetus to avoid metals in personal care products is clear. (Though they are technically “natural,” these metals have been linked to adverse health effects in people and animals.) 

  • How it ends up in formulas: Trace amounts often crop up as contaminants due to exposure before the product is bottled. Because they occur naturally in soil and bodies of water where material used for dyes and pigments are found, in addition to their presence at manufacturing plants, heavy metals have multiple avenues into our personal care products.  They can then be absorbed through the skin and form potentially harmful complexes with the proteins in the body. 

2. Bisphenol A (BPA): Over the past decade, this industrial compound has received a lot of unsavory attention for its presence in plastic  water bottles. But the prevalence of BPA, a potential endocrine disruptor with links to various forms of cancer, extends even farther.

  • How it ends up in formulas: Trace amounts often crop up as contaminants due to exposure before the product is bottled. Because they occur naturally in soil and bodies of water where material used for dyes and pigments are found, in addition to their presence at manufacturing plants, heavy metals have multiple avenues into our personal care products.  They can then be absorbed through the skin and form potentially harmful complexes with the proteins in the body.

3. Parabens: Cumulative exposure to parabens, which are preservatives commonly found in cosmetics and other personal care products,has been associated with potential hormone disruption and increased risk for breast cancer. Check your bottles for words like methylparaben, butylparaben, and propylparaben to avoid parabens. Luckily, many products now include paraben-free labels.

  • How it ends up in formulas: Typically, these are intentionally added as preservatives to boost a product’s lifespan.

4. Nitrosamines: Commonly found in products that use nitrites as preservatives, nitrosamines are thought to be carcinogenic when taken in by a wide array of animals at high doses. Although us humans would likely only experience this compound in smaller amounts, Mother Dirt attempts to minimize risk to ourselves and the environment by filtering it out.

  • How it ends up in formulas: Nitrosamines are another tricky category of compounds that sneak in with preservatives. They result from chemical reactions after formulation, so nitrosamines won’t be listed as ingredients. They can also tag along with contaminations from organic dyes and vegetable extracts.

5. 1,4-dioxane: The fact that 1,4-dioxane is a manufacturing byproduct makes it another compound that slips the product ingredient list. The main route of exposure to 1,4-dioxane is by inhalation, whichcan resultineye, nose, and throat irritation, as well as organ toxicity in cases of larger and prolonged exposures, typically associated with workers. In addition to its presence as a contaminant in personal care products, 1,4-dioxane also has several industrial uses and is commonly found as a groundwater and surface water contaminant as a result of industrial discharge.

To avoid 1,4-dioxane, look out for products that contain sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) and PEG compounds instead. Many companies are phasing out surfactants, as well, so we may not even have to worry about these before too long!

  • How it ends up in formulas: As a manufacturing byproduct of SLS and SLES, two common surfactants (i.e. foaming or lathering agents) found in personal care products. 1,4-dioxane appears in trace amounts in products like shampoo, lotion, and toothpaste that are made with SLES or SLES.

6. Phthalates: As long as there is plastic around, phthalates are very tough to avoid. Their ubiquitous nature  is concerning as phthalates are thought to be hormone disruptors by many, though the FDA describes their impact as “negligible.”

  • How it ends up in formulas: These compounds are used to make packaging more fluid and flexible, so they are found in containers all over the personal care, food, and beverage industries.

Wherever there is a long, complex manufacturing process and the interaction of varied ingredients, there is also a sliver of uncertainty. Our commitment to safety extends as far as the science that supports it and as we progress and grow, we aim to shrink this gray area as much as knowingly possible.

 

 


 
 
Comments
First Time Customers
Get 20% Off + Free Shipping
Signup to learn more
Your Coupon Code is:
freeship20
Sign me up
Shop Now